Who Cares About Improvement When You Still Feel Like S#*%

Feeling better is the reason you would go through therapy or any health treatment, RIGHT?

Who doesn’t want to show improvement?

Maybe you can relate…

You are deep into therapy or treatment, and each visit comes with its own set of questions.

  • How are your symptoms?
  • Are you feeling better?
  • Where are you on a scale from 1-10?

I GET IT… successes AND failures must be measured.

  • Where are you at now?
  • Are you at a 6?
  • Are you able to recognize what helps reduce your symptoms?

MOST PEOPLE might think twice about spending a decent chunk of their day performing exercises that would cause them to feel worse in hopes they get somewhat better.

It’s crazy. Right? WRONG!

A lesson smacked me upside the head today!

7 years ago when the vertigo and disequilibrium set in, I could not even walk around the block. I felt so nasty I hardly ventured out of the house.

Check out this photo! I am not sure what inspired babe to take this photo of me (SO glad he did. I have something to show ya!)

Marissa in the early days of the vestibular madness  laying on couch rockin sea bands

I am rocking two sea bands and riding out the nausea and room spin.

*Sea-Bands are a bracelet that is supposed to help with nausea and motion sickness.

(I was desperate! I would have tried ANYTHING at that moment in time. I am still open to trying MOST things.)

After the walk today, I glanced down at the pedometer, and it read… 2.147 miles!

Pedometer reading 2 miles

WHAT THE HECK!

It took me 7 YEARS to go from barely making it around the block to being able to walk 2 miles!

I can confidently say I am walking 2 more miles than many able bodied persons.

Do I feel like hell after my walk? YES

Do I struggle throughout the walk? ABSOLUTELY

Has the dizziness, disequilibrium and vertigo changed much in the last 7 years? NO

So why even try? BECAUSE… Small improvements + action= PURPOSE

I will no longer poo-poo or shy away from recognizing and acknowledging small victories (YES… improvement)!

Much love,
Marissa

Video Blog: Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Day 1 and beyond

ATTENTION: If you suffer from a vestibular disorder or are sensitive to motion and movement, please note that this video is at times shaky. ( I am working on a solution)

I will be documenting my journey through Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy. This video details day one. I end up running into the insurance machine but this time I prevail.

The focus of this visit was initial evaluation. The purpose of the visit was to provide history and set realistic expectations.

The goggles are part of the device called Videonystagmoscopy

“Videonystagmoscopy has been used to subjectively observe the responses of the vestibular system in a population of patients with vestibular deficits. The videonystagmoscopy device is made of one or two CCD cameras mounted on lightproof goggles, allowing a subjective observation of ocular movements on a video monitor. The eye movements, as well as the position of the head in space, can be recorded on videotape.”

As we reveal my defects we will gather a realistic expectation of what can be achieved through vestibular rehabilitation.

Much love,
Marissa

Canalithiasis, is that even a word?

It’s quite interesting that I worked in the medical field for a period  of time before being sidelined by my condition. I was becoming intimately  familiar with the daily dealings of the administrative side of healthcare. Working alongside doctors and nurses, training them how to run sophisticated electronic medical records, I found myself mastering the art of labeling. In order for me to train them properly, I had to understand the workflow of the hospital and how patients were triaged, treated and released. Immediately, as patients are checked into the clinic or hospital, the goal was to quickly assess and compartmentalize information in order to give patients a label. The labeling came in different forms,  such as the placing of a medical wristband on the patient for identification, to entering a diagnosis code into the system so that the insurance would be billed properly. It was interesting to see how well oiled the machine ran, until a patient presenting rare or interesting symptoms forced a wrench in the system and was spit out.

Which leads me into my personal journey and how my condition threw a wrench in the system. I will save you the stress of intimate details and break this down as much as I can…

Continue reading