Crying In The Middle Of JCPenney | Family and Chronic Illness

Crying emotion

“Crying Emotiguy” by farconville

You read that right. I don’t want to give you the impression that I was uncontrollably sobbing, but I did have to take my glasses off and wipe tears.

I was accompanied by my future mother-in-law and we were wandering between men’s big & tall and the guys department.

Combing over the sale rack I was overcome with a spirit of thankfulness. I glanced at my future mother-in-law and blurted out…

“Thank you for everything you have done for me.”

Next thing you know the tears were flowing. We quickly embraced and began to walk it out!

Let me tell you, I wasn’t expecting that!

I have had a few days to reflect on why those emotions surfaced. I have come to the following conclusions.

Unfortunelty, when you are living with an invisible chronic illness you often find yourself trying to convince others that you are suffering from a real condition that they can’t physically see.

I try to be as authentic with people as I can, but certain individuals don’t completely embrace my story as believable.

8 years into this condition I am learning to be OK with the idea that some people can’t be convinced.

I am less tolerant when it comes to members of the medical community. Certain doctors and “specialist” I have encountered have taken the position that credibility comes in the form of blood work, CT’s and MRI’s. If everything comes out “normal” your credibility is shot.

Then comes the patronizing phrasing…

“Are you more stressed than usual?”
“Is everything OK at home?”
“Have you considered seeing someone in mental health?”

You know something is TERRIBLY wrong, but the person you believed had the power to fix it has thrown in the towel. They have closed off the idea of possibility and you are disregarded.

Thank GOD not all medical professionals are cut from the same cloth.

Which takes me back to why I got emotional in the middle of JCPenney.

I really should have said to her …

“Thank you for believing me! Thank you for not dismissing me or second guessing me. Thank you for making adjustments to my situation.”

I can count on seeing three people on a daily basis. THREE! One of those individuals is my future mother-in-law.

She believes me! She doesn’t question me. She knows who I was before and who I am now. She didn’t discard me or question me, and that is why I cried in the middle of JCPenney.

If you are being dismissed or ignored, hang in. There will be a person that comes into your circle that doesn’t need to be convinced. They will embrace, believe, and accept. Just promise yourself that when that person presents himself or herself you won’t take them for granted!

Much love,
Marissa

Helpful Links To Dizziness Communities and Services

My goal is to provide helpful and useful trusted resources. If you believe your group, organization, or service should be added to this list please do not hesitate to contact me.

finger clicking url address link Image: digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Online Community  Dizziness Support Groups:

The Dizziness Blues: http://www.facebook.com/dizzinessblues

The Dizziness Blues is an active Facebook community: ” For All Those Who Suffer From Chronic Dizziness and know that it’s true what they say… Dizziness Sucks!.”

 

Support Organizations:

VEDA- Vestibular Disorders Association: http://www.vestibular.org

VEDA’s mission statement: “To serve people with vestibular disorders by providing access to information, offering a support network, and elevating awareness of the challenges associated with these disorders.”

 

Podcast:

The People’s Pharmacy: http://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2011/06/04/816-balance-disorders/

Podcast 816 focuses on balance disorders.  Guest, Dr. David Kaylie, Medical Director Of The Vestibular Lab at Duke University Medical Center. Interesting podcast on balance disorders. It speaks to various forms of balance disorders.

Much love,
Marissa