Accessibility Friendly Website And Hero Of The Week!

I stumbled upon an accessibility hero this week, and his name is Eddie Yu.

Allow me to set the scene…

It’s midnight, and I couldn’t sleep. I began filtering through saved bookmarks trolling websites looking for career direction.

One of the bookmarks led me to Eddie’s website.

Before we get ANY DEEPER into the story, it makes sense to provide you with context.

For those that don’t know I suffer from a vestibular (balance) dysfunction which has left me with 24 hour disequilibrium and moments of vertigo.

These symptoms are NOT FRIENDLY for working in a standard 8-5 office environment. I realize I am going to have to find an EXTREMELY FLEXIBLE CAREER working from home, hence the reason for trolling work-from -home websites and blogs.

With those small details out of the way, let’s press on.

Landing on Eddie’s website IMMEDIATELY reminded me of my limitations.

I couldn’t  absorb ANY of the content! WHY? The background was moving. Remember that vestibular dysfunction I talked about earlier? The site was so visually oriented that it was provoking symptoms such as nausea, disorientation and mental confusion.

Eddie’s site before the adjustment (Motion Alert: heads up vestibular folks!)

NORMALLY when I’m greeted with heavy visual movement on websites I move on. Maybe because it was approaching 1:00am and I was tired and annoyed by the movement that I took direct action.

I jumped on twitter and began typing away…

Twitter messages to Eddie altering his that his content was not accessible to me because of my vestibular  disability

 

After I realized what I set into motion I became nervous. I started thinking…

“Who am I to ask someone to change their website?”

“Majority of people can view his site with no problem, Marissa, let it be!”

I even vented my frustrations to my vestibular support group and via direct message to a true accessibility expert.

But as fate would have it Eddie was prompt and kind in his response.

Eddie's twitter response to looking into the issue.

Eddie’s positive response made me feel guilty. INTERESTING, because if he dismissed or ignored me, I would have chalked it up as him being a jerk and moved on.

I was sound asleep when Eddie sent the following tweet…

Eddie's twiiter response stating the problem was addressed with a pause/play button

Rough night sleeping, woke up late, feeling yucky, BUT ALL THAT CHANGED when I saw the tweet that Eddie and his team had come up with a solution!

I didn’t even check out the solution! I yelled out to Babe telling him how great I thought Eddie was!

“BABE… he didn’t even have to respond!”

I EAGERLY headed to the site and the solution didn’t work.

“Babe… should I just drop it? It’s enough that he even responded.”

Babe encouraged me to respond.

I created a quick video for Eddie and team to show that I was not seeing the fix.

Eddie’s twitter response….

Eddie's twitter response alerting me of  his user-friendly changes.

If you NOW check out Eddie’s site you will see that he was ELIMINATED THE MOVEMENT  A-N-D created different background patterns for the user to choose from.

WHOOP! Victory. I can now choose the pattern that is the least visually bothersome to me, and NOW I can read the content.

SO… if you are interested in learning form a man with strong business and entrepreneurial acumen with a  great heart, please check out Eddie Yu’s website.

Connect with Eddie via Twitter. Don’t hesitate to shoot him a tweet and tell him how AWESOME he is! :)

Much love,
Marissa

P.S. Please note I am not an accessibility expert.  I am just a gal with a disability trying to make sure the web is accessible to those with vestibular disorders!

2 comments

  1. Hi Marissa. I have a vestibular disorder as well. I experience life using less than 50% vestibular function in just 1 ear! Other ear is dead. Anyway, I checked out the original website just to see if I too would feel awful after viewing it. Boy oh boy did I ever feel yucky, and it was a tiny image. If it was the entire screen I would not have been able to look at it longer than a second! It was very nice of Eddie to modify his website.

    Let me know when you come up with an occupation that fits with a vestibular disorder.

    Nancy

    • Nancy!

      WOW, less than 50% vestibular function in just one ear! I wish you were close so I could hug you. You are a solider. Even though I am living with vestibular dysfunction, I can only imagine how difficult this journey has been for you.

      Thank you for validating that the original website was so bothersome. I often question if it’s a small minority of people with vestibular dysfunction that experience difficulty with moving elements on a webpage. The movement is VERY bothersome to me, so I assume it would be bothersome to the some members of the community. Wish there was some research I could pull from to validate what I am feeling when looking at websites with so much movement.

      I will for sure let you know if I come up with an occupation. There have been a few suggestions thrown around, so I am hopeful something will come about.

      If you want to connect, please don’t hesitate.http://abledis.com/get-in-touch

      Take care of you!

      Much love,
      Marissa

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